Carrot Souffle

    Carrot Souffle

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    Carrot Souffle Recipe

    Why does anyone go through the trouble of baking a soufflé? It takes time, you dirty up too many dishes, and you have to tip toe around in the kitchen so it doesn’t fall flat. Nowadays we are so busy and our culture is geared toward making everything happen quick, now and instant, but I think it’s worth slowing down to bake a soufflé once in a while.

    I think of soufflés as being something served at a fancy dinner or for a special occasion. What better time to serve up something that took love and time than at Thanksgiving? I can’t imagine that the pilgrims or Native Americans served soufflé, but it’s still fun to make.

    Soufflé is a French word that means to “puff up” or “let breathe.” Egg whites are beaten with sugar until feathery and full of air. Then, when mixed with the fat of the yolks, other ingredients and baked, the air bubbles trapped in the egg whites expand, making… soufflé! If done properly it will form a kind of scaffold that keeps the soufflé from collapsing.

    Often soufflés are prepared in the dessert form, but a savory soufflé is unique and notable. My aunt Cyndi used to serve a carrot soufflé that was delicate, melted in your mouth and tasted rich but light at the same time. When I want to make an impression or serve up some love, I always prepare my version of this impressive side dish.

    Carrots come in a few colors such as yellow and white, even purple, but for this recipe I use only the orange carrots. Not only do the orange carrots contain a certain antioxidant called beta-carotene, which is good for you, but also they are high in vitamin A. This dish cooks up to look like a fluffy sweet potato casserole, but it leaves a unique flavor and texture in your mouth. Prepare my version of the succulent carrot soufflé as a side dish, and I can assure you it will resonate with your family and friends.

     

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    Carrot Souffle
    This dish cooks up to look like a fluffy sweet potato casserole, but it leaves a unique flavor and texture in your mouth.
    Carrot Souffle Recipe Plated
    Servings
    people
    Ingredients
    Servings
    people
    Ingredients
    Carrot Souffle Recipe Plated
    Instructions
    1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
    2. Grease a 1½ quart dish.
    3. Boil carrots in water for 15 to 20 min or until soft. In a food processor, process cooked carrots until smooth.
    4. In another clean bowl, whip the egg whites with the sugar until frothy. Add the butter and egg yolks to the processor and pulse.
    5. In a separate bowl, mix the flour; baking powder, nutmeg and cinnamon then slowly add the dry ingredients to the carrot mixture in the processor while pulsing.
    6. Add the egg white/sugar mixture into the carrot mixture and pulse.
    7. Pour into the greased dish and bake uncovered at 350 degrees for 1 hour and 15 min until it’s puffed and golden.
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    Growing up in a small town in the foothills of North Carolina, Sandi always dreamed of living on the coast. In her youth, she was always by the water; she was raised tending a big garden and stomping around in the creek. She spent her adolescent days on a Jet Ski or fishing on Lake James, N.C., and she and her friends would camp and hike the Linville Gorge. Attending the University of North Carolina at Charlotte she felt like she was getting out of my small-town box and living the city life; at the same time, she was getting a little closer to the ocean. Moving to Wilmington has been a dream come true, and the life she has created has been a blessing. She enjoys kayaking the Cape Fear, fishing the shores of Carolina Beach, and picking up seashells and shark’s teeth wherever she is. At home, she loves to cook and play with her dogs in the backyard. She also enjoys DIY home improvement endeavors. No outdoor shower, fire pit or flower bed is too big of a job! Being a part of the North Brunswick Magazine and South Brunswick Magazine team has taught Sandi that you really can enjoy your career.

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